Akron Summit County Public Library

aLibrary1Akron Summit County Public Library
Wooster Ave, Nordonia Hills
East Akron and Mogadore Branches


SBM performed HVAC, plumbing and fire protection engineering services for four satellite branches for the Akron-Summit County Public Libraries including Wooster Ave, Nordonia Hills, East Akron and Mogadore Branches. The libraries consisted of one addition to the East Akron branch with the remaining libraries as new buildings, each at approximately 15,000 SF. The HVAC systems for two of the new buildings included constant volume packaged rooftop air handling units located on the ground outside each building with ductwork distributed throughout the building. The remaining two buildings included constant volume packaged rooftop air handling units and constant volume indoor units with condensing units located on the exterior of the building. In the existing East Akron Branch, the boiler was replaced to serve the existing perimeter heat as well as serve the new perimeter heat in the addition. In order to minimize energy costs in the libraries, the outdoor air required for the air handling units was controlled with CO2 control that reduced the outside air in the building during non-peak hours. The air handling units were designed to minimize the number of units while maximizing control through zone controls without the use of building reheat.

New domestic water heaters were designed and installed to serve the needs of the building along with new domestic water service entrances as required.

Fire suppression systems were installed in the three new buildings per NFPA.

Federal Express - Custom Critical

fExpress1Federal Express
Custom Critical
Akron, Ohio


This 260,000 sq. ft. facility is largely served by an underfloor air distribution system. The underfloor air distribution system allows for highly flexible office spaces which can be reconfigured at a minimum cost, time and effort. The underfloor air distribution is thought to be the state-of-the-art type of system to be used for office type environments. An overhead VAV system is installed in areas of the building not conducive to the underfloor air system. These areas are the dining hall, kitchen, main entry, elevator lobbies, utility rooms and toilet rooms.

 

 

Huntington Museum

hMuseum1Huntington Museum
Isabelle Gwynn and
Robert Daine Gallery
Huntington, WV

MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING
TELECOMMUNICATION
CIVIL


Scheeser Buckley Mayfield provided mechanical and electrical design services for a 3,600 sq ft addition to the Huntington Museum. The addition was needed to increase the art collection displayed at the museum. SBM had to research the NEC code to determine lighting load calculations for large quantity of track lighting provided in gallery. The HVAC design on the project consisted of extending the existing multi‐zone air handling unit and boiler system to serve the new addition. Hydronic reheat coils were installed in the ductwork to provide heating and dehumidification for the vault and gallery spaces. Plumbing for the addition consisted of new roof drains and storm piping. Domestic water and gas piping was relocated to accommodate the addition. Electric baseboard heaters were installed under the windows in the gallery space to prevent condensation on the glass. The fire protection design consisted of installing an FM‐200 system to protect the vault storage space. The electrical design included interior track lighting that could be adjusted depending on what is being displayed. All the interior and exterior lighting is programmable through a digital programmable panel. The design included the installation of track lighting so the 150 watt per foot was not exceeded and still make it simple to control the lighting. One feature was the exterior lighting “light wands” along the walkway. A unique feature of this project was integrating current lighting devices to permit lower lighting loads to decrease additional power requirements. An outdoor courtyard was constructed between the new addition and existing building. The lighting provided for this courtyard will greatly enhance the look and function of this outdoor space.

Kent State University - East Campus Chilled Water Plant

ksuWaterPlant1Kent State University
East Campus Chilled Water Plant

MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL


This project included the conception and design of a central chilled water plant to serve numerous Residence Halls, academic buildings and auxiliary buildings at the east end of the Kent Campus. The new two story plant was located in a separate building designed specifically for use as a chilled water production facility. The system was designed as a primary/secondary distribution system with variable flow pumping to the connected buildings. The production of the chilled water was accomplished with two 850 ton high efficiency electrical centrifugal chillers and one 850 ton low pressure steam absorption chiller. The plant was designed to accept a future 850 ton chiller as load increases on the campus. The chiller operation sequence was custom designed by SBM to allow optional use by operators of steam energy or electric energy based on time of day or other circumstances. The temperature control systems were a combination of pneumatic moving devices and digital sensors, and the logic was provided by a Trane digital chiller control system integrated into the campus Johnson Controls Metasys system through the use of BacNet. The project also included the connecting of piping to numerous existing buildings with existing chillers which were ready to be retired. Commissioning services were also provided for this project by a separate team. The electrical design for this project included connection to the campus 13.2KV loop with two loop type pad mount transformers. Two services entered the building, one at 4160V for the centrifugal chillers and one at 480V for miscellaneous pumps and mechanical equipment. The 480V was then stepped down in the building to 208/120V for general purpose receptacles. This project also involved several motor control centers, cooling tower connections and medium voltage chiller connections. In addition, a transformer vault was created and a medium voltage manhole was designed for the site.

During the commissioning phase, SBM worked hand-in-hand with the balancing contractor to assure all mixing bridges were setup as designed to deliver only the required cooling capacity at each building to minimize energy consumption. SBM also worked diligently with both Johnson Controls and Trane control contractors to assure the correct information was being transmitted between the two control systems to accomplish the design objectives. At one point in the commissioning phase SBM staffed the project with six individuals located at each building connected to the system. It was important to know what was happening in each building at exactly the same time. This coordinated effort allowed SBM to verify the control operation and fine tune the system to operate at peak efficiency.

Summa Hospital - New Parking Garage

sHospital1Summa Hospital
New Parking Garage

MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING
FIREPROTECTION
CIVIL
TELECOM


Scheeser Buckley Mayfield provided mechanical, plumbing, fire protection, civil, electrical and telecommunications for a new 7 story, 500 space parking garage. The parking garage was built to support a new orthopedic Hospital. Prior to construction of the garage, major utilities were relocated from the site as part of a separate project. The utilities included moving cooling towers and installing more than 2 miles of underground tower water piping. A new pump house was constructed at the site the towers were moved to. The utility relocation included major electrical feeders. The construction cost for the utility relocation was over $5,000,000 which was not included in the cost to construct the garage. The utilities which were relocated also included a 500 PSI steam line and condensate line. A dry pipe standpipe system was used to protect the open area structure. The plumbing systems served the bathroom group and area drains. One unique feature of this project was the exclusive use of LED lighting and the use of daylighting controls for this parking structure. The electrical system included a medium-voltage feeder and transformer within the structure’s electrical room along with extensive coordination for a future feeder to serve this structure from a future building. Emergency power was brought over from the existing hospital. LED lighting was provided throughout the parking structure and energy consumption was far below energy code allowances. Daylighting controls were added such that the rows of lights closest to the outside walls will not turn unless there is insufficient daylight. SBM coordinated with Summa to obtain a rate reduction from First Energy due to the reduction in energy obtained by utilizing LED Fixtures. Telecommunications design included one new telecommunications cabinet connected to the main building with fiber optic and multipair copper cabling. User workstations were connected to the telecommunications cabinet with CAT6 cable.

The University of Akron - Football Stadium Academic Development

uafStadium1The University of Akron
Football Stadium Academic Development
(Multiplex Stadium)

MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING
TELECOMMUNICATION


Scheeser Buckley Mayfield LLC provided the mechanical, plumbing, electrical, and telecommunications design for the completion of approximately 40,000 sq. ft. of shelled space in the new press box building of the University of Akron Football Stadium. The space will be occupied by the Department of Sports Science and Wellness with four areas of study: Athletic Training, Exercise Science, Physical Education, and General Studies. The scheduling and phasing of the project was complex due to the fact that the stadium was being constructed (designed by a separate AE team), as the design for this project commenced. Separate bid packages for shell completion and fire suppression were prepared to ensure that the building could occupancy permits could be obtained in time for the Fall 2009 athletic schedule. The design included new air handling units for each floor including energy conserving controls, integrated with occupancy and carbon dioxide sensors. The project included a new chiller and additional boilers, integrated with the central systems already being constructed. New energy metering was also included so that all heating, chilled and domestic water utilized by the academic programs could be calculated separately from the athletic programs. Plumbing fixtures were designed to utilize low water consumption flush valves and faucets with battery sensor operation. The water closets operate with 1.28 gallons per flush, the urinals with 0.125 gallons per flush and the lavatories with 0.5 gallons per minute. This project is served by a dedicated natural gas fired water heater located at the roof level mechanical room. The natural gas serving this water heater is metered separately from the rest of the building along with the domestic water service. This project is served with a domestic water riser system extending down from the roof level mechanical room and then serves each level with horizontal mains. A recirculated domestic hot water system maintains hot water temperature. The electrical design consisted of new distribution equipment for normal and emergency power sized to serve floors 200, 300 and 400. Lighting power densities were designed to approximately .8W/ft2 and when applied in the energy model with daylight harvesting and occupancy sensors optimizes the energy performance for the client. The lighting controls system was designed with an integral web server for maximized control for the user and facilities.

The University of Akron - Multiplex Student Housing

uaMultiplex1The University of Akron
Multiplex Student Housing
Akron, Ohio

MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
TELECOM
CIVIL
PLUMBING


Scheeser Buckley Mayfield provided mechanical, plumbing, electrical, telecommunications and civil design services for a 5 story, 70,000 sq. ft, 460 bed residence hall for The University of Akron. The new residence hall will encourage more students to live on campus and to continue the campus-wide master plan of a Landscape for Learning. The building is primarily conditioned with a two-pipe fan coil system capable of simultaneous heating and cooling. The building utilizes modular natural gas boilers for heating water and domestic water and is equipped with an air-cooled chiller for cooling. Energy recovery ventilators are utilized to pressurize the building with pre-conditioned outdoor air. Scheeser Buckley Mayfield utilized common piping risers for supply and return piping for fan coil risers. The methodology allows each floor to use a portion of the heating and cooling capacity of the riser, reducing piping costs and taking advantage of system diversity when sizing primary equipment.

The plumbing system includes a centralized boiler water domestic water heating system with a pumped recirculation system. Domestic hot and cold water service to resident rooms are via risers with individual shut-offs. Resident rooms include a water closet, lavatory, and a shower or tub depending on room layout. The fire protection system includes a combination standpipe and wet pipe system for the basement floor through fifth floor levels and a packaged dry pipe system for the attic. The domestic hot water system includes a state of the art electronic master mixing valve that offers the owner exceptional control of system hot water temperature.

Site utilities were extended from public right-of-way to the building. Design work included coordination with Dominion East Ohio for their extension of a new medium pressure gas line from Union Street to Spicer Street to serve this development. There was limited surface area available for stormwater management facility so underground system was utilized.

The project also included the design and installation of a rainwater harvesting system that collected rainwater from the building and from the underground stormwater detention system and treated this water for use in an irrigation system that serves this dorm and the adjacent football stadium. The system was design in conjunction with the site’s stormwater management system and was design to allowed for the system to be easily drained during the off-season and brought back on line in the spring.

The electrical system included providing for 23KV distribution to the site from the University owned Forge Street as well as providing secondary 23KV distribution loop from the university owned Carroll Street Substation. These two loop feeds provided the dormitory a stable secondary source of power should the primary loop fail. This required the addition of a new six section 23KV sectionalizing switches arranged to serve the padmount transformers serving the multiplex dormitory and fire pump as well as to accommodate future expansion of additional dormitories on the same site. One padmount transformer provided normal power to the building and a second padmount transformer was for the fire pump. The secondary side of the padmount provides a 3000A, 480V, 3phase service to the building.

Site work included the extension of the existing power and telecommunications ductbanks that were installed for the stadium project to serve the dormitory. The site required careful coordination with the new football stadium project which was under construction and resulted in a combined electrical yard located at the southeast end of the stadium. This electrical yard included the padmount transformers serving the stadium the electrical distribution equipment serving the dormitory project, generators, and future space provisions for the future dormitories.

The electrical distribution entered the basement level and was distributed throughout the building was provided via two electrical rooms per floor located at opposite ends of the building. Additional distribution was provided in the basement level and the attic level to provide for power for mechanical and electrical equipment. Distribution to the floors was accomplished by using larger dry type transformers in the basement level to serve the upper floors thus minimizing heat load and noise through the residential spaces.

The electrical lighting consists of LED troffer type lensed fixtures and LED downlights in all of the public spaces. Fixtures in the residents rooms were a combination of linear fluorescent troffers and compact fluorescent downlights. Specialty and feature lighting was provided where appropriate and where coordinated with the architect. Dormitory spaces were provided with linear fluorescent fixtures and wall sconces for general illumination. Occupancy sensors were provided where the space was suitable for the application. The lamping consisted of primarily LED, T5 and T8 technologies in an effort to promote energy savings.

A fire alarm system was provided and included ADA provisions to serve select rooms per the architect’s direction. The fire alarm system included speaker strobes and included a voice command center to allow for verbal communication throughout the building in the event of an emergency condition. The fire alarm system was networked back to the main central monitoring point located on the other side of the campus using the campus fiber optic network.

An emergency power system was provided and included the installation of a 750KW diesel generator located on the site. This emergency power distribution is arranged into the life safety and equipment branchs through the use of multiple transfer switches. Emergency power was distributed throughout the facility. The generator was sized to allow for its use in serving the planned future dormitory projects located on the same site.

The telecommunications system included one (1) main telecom room connected to nine (9) telecom rooms with multipair, fiber optic and coaxial cable. Workstations connected to the telecom rooms with Category Six UTP and RG6 coax horizontal cable. Outlets for wireless access points were also provided. AV cabling included high/low outlets for analog video/audio as well as HDMI.

The project complies with the University of Akron’s goals to comply with HB 251 by exceeding ASHRAE 90.1 energy performance by 19.9%. The budget and design/construction schedule have been aggressively reduced to meet the University’s requirements.

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